Scientist Creates the World’s Tiniest Gingerbread House

December 22, 2019
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‘Tis the season for microscopic holiday treats.

Put away your baking ingredients because a Canadian scientist has created the world’s smallest “gingerbread house” using an electron microscope, reported the New York Post.

Travis Casagrande, a research associate at McMaster University, etched the detailed decoration out of silicone and included intricate touches such as bricks, a wreath, snow and even a Canadian flag welcome mat.

While obviously invisible to the human eye, the entire festive piece is 10 times tinier than the width of a human hair.

Thanks to extremely enlarged images published by the Canadian Center for Electron Microscopy (CCEM), the miniscule manor is even more impressive as it actually sits on top of winking snowman which Casagrande created out of materials from a lithium ion battery.

And to further try to wrap your head around the size of the gingerbread house and the snowman, a human hair was placed next to both.

“In the construction of the gingerbread house, you don’t really have a sense of the scale until we zoom out and you see it’s on a snowman, which is also extremely tiny,” Casagrande said.

“And then you don’t really know what the scale is, either, until you see the hair. And you’re like, ‘Wow, that house is tiny.'”

The non-edible “gingerbread house” appeared to set a new record as it is half the size of one made in France last year, according to the University.

Casagrande, whose last name’s literal translation in Spanish means “big house,” was motivated to start the Yuletide project to show off what the CCEM is capable of doing and to spark interest with the general public.

"I think projects like this create science curiosity," Casagrande added. "I think for both children and adults, it's important to be curious about science. Looking into how this was made leads to more interest in science, and that builds more science literacy, which allows everyone to make better decisions."

Translation: It’s pretty cool.

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